Channeling Freddie Mercury, Part Two

For those of you who didn’t get a chance to listen to Robert and Erik’s interview on Follow Your Bliss, please do. Erik shouts out “MOM!” at exactly 52:38. It sounds like him as a little boy. The quality is very “EVP-ish.”


For those of you seeking the gifts of a talented psychic and one with a wonderful relationship with our boy, Erik, please allow me to introduce you to Kristen Moss: RN, psychic medium, hands on healer

Kristen resides in central Wisconsin with her husband and three children. While in her mid twenties, she received a psychic reading that inspired her to learn more about developing her own intuitive gifts. Weeks later, she was offering readings to her friends and family ranging from mediumship to intuitive guidance. She later was trained in hands on healing techniques of Reiki I, II, and III and Quantum Touch.

Kristen’s caring and compassionate nature lead to a nearly 20 year career working in healthcare in a wide variety of settings. In mid 2011, feeling burned out working as an RN, she decided to take some time off to spend with her family and nurture her spiritual gifts. She sees clients in her home for psychic readings (mediumship, life direction and past life awareness), and hands on healing sessions. She is also available for phone consultations as well as distant healing.

To set up an appointment, you may contact Kristen through email or call her directly:
tele 920.420.8544


One last thing before Freddie takes center stage. Erik came up with a “lovely” slogan for the Channeling Erik event in Austin. He asked me to design t-shirts with that slogan, so I did. I also made some bumperstickers and buttons if anyone is interested in spreading the word. Otherwise, it’s just good plain fun knowing that Erik is still on his game.

make custom gifts at Zazzle


And now, part two of our interview with Mr. Mercury.

Me: Can you describe your thoughts when you realized you had crossed over?

Freddie: You know, I really did ask, ‘Where the hell are the bloody angels!’ I said it really boisterously.

Jamie, Erik and I laugh hard. We could just hear him.

Freddie: And what followed soon after was laughter. I knew then that I had the right heaven, that I hadn’t gone to hell.

Jamie and I laugh.

Freddie: My family was there. It was a white room with no walls, but I knew it was a room. I knew I was contained somehow.


Jamie (sounding a bit choked up): Aw, the emotions that come across are way heavier than the words themselves.

Freddie: I took a moment to release; I took a moment to cry.

Jamie: The energy that comes out of him kind of chokes me up a little bit. That’s how much he was looking forward just to die.

Freddie: Yeah, my body ate me alive.

Me: Oh, what an awful disease. Well, was it your destiny to die when and how you did? If so, why?

Freddie: I believe it was. You know, I don’t think I would have been happier growing old and not being able to perform. I only wanted that life on the stage, and I got that right up until the end.

Me: Were you meant to die from that particular disease?

Freddie: I think it was very selfless of me to follow through with this. It wasn’t until my death that this disease really got mapped, got noticed.

Me: So you were meant to bring AIDS awareness and understanding to the world?

Freddie: Yes.

Me: Was that meant on a different level than for your own personal reasons? Was it also to teach us about compassion and acceptance toward groups of people who are often targeted and maligned and who often bear the brunt of fear-based emotions and thoughts?

Freddie: Absolutely. A lot of people like to categorize me as a gay man. I think I appropriately fit the category of a man who loved whomever was best for me—male or female. Bisexual doesn’t do it do it justice, because there was nothing in me that was divided that way.

Me: Interesting.

Jamie (laughing): He likes to call it “all sexual”!

Me: There we go, and all sexual man! So, can you describe your afterlife now? What do you do there? Do you have a life’s work? What does it look like? You know the drill.

Freddie: I have a place to come home to, but I rarely find myself doing so. Most of my passion is devoted to working with artists who are still living who find an inspiration in me, and I help them with the writing of the music, the singing of the music, the expression. I feel a bit like everyone’s mother in the fact that I want to keep them out of the limelight’s harm.

Me: Oh, yeah. Did you gain any new insights once you were in the afterlife?

Freddie: I gained that what I wanted to believe about heaven while I was on earth actually exists.

Me: Anything else.

Freddie (chuckling): I think that should cover everything.

Me: So, you shared what you were here to learn; do you have anything else to add to that?

Freddie: No, but I really think I was here to teach the all sexual thing.

(Pause as I wait in vain for him to expound.)

Me: Do you have any regrets?

Freddie: Actually, when I look back, when I was alive, I still have a little regret for not handling my band mates with more respect.

Me: Okay. What past life affected this last life the most?


Jamie: Um, he’s kind of joking with Erik right now. I’m not really in the conversation with them, but they’re joking about a life where—

(Pause as Jamie eavesdrops further)

Jamie: Are you guys for real!! Just tell me if this is for real or not!

(Jamie giggles)

Jamie (to Erik and Freddie): You’re joking? Okay. I’m gullible! I’m gullible, I know!

Me: I am too.

Jamie: They were talking about a life of being an orangutan, and Erik and him are just slapsticking back and forth. The smell and the hair of the orangutan and what the sex is like!

Me (Laughing): Oh my god!

Jamie: I’m gullible. You got me, boys. So tell me a past life for real!

(Pause as Jamie listens to Freddie)

Jamie: He shows me this image of a blond-headed, curly, curly-haired girl. She’s probably four or five years old. Kind of still has some baby fat features, you know, round cheeks. Kind of like a blond Shirley Temple.

Me: Okay.

Freddie: I recall vividly in that life—

Jamie: I asked him, ‘Where was it’ and he shows me snow and ice that goes on forever!

Jamie: Oh, he jokes. He says it’s probably close to where you have your cabin. Like a Nordic region.

Me: Yeah, in Norway!

Freddie: I remember being told in that life that the water was hot and not to touch the water and that the ice was cold and not to be out in the cold too long. There were rules that were more about life and death to protect you and keep you safe, because it was such a harsh environment. And I remember thinking, ‘Why are they telling me this? Why can’t they just let me be?’ I just wanted to be on my own.

(Pause and Jamie listens more)

Jamie (to Freddie): Well that’s not a great story.

Me: What?

Jamie: He tells me what happened was that he continued to go against what his parents were saying. He had a mother, father, large family. (counting)  One, two, three, four—five children. He was one of five. He’s the youngest. Doesn’t really get paid attention, can do his own thing, walks out into the snow and didn’t dress appropriately. So, he froze, died in the snow.

Me: Aw.

Jamie: At such a young age.

Me: Aw, how sad.

Freddie: I remember leaving that life, saying, ‘Why couldn’t I trust those people?’

Me: Ah!

Freddie: I was really hard on myself for doing that and thought, ‘Maybe some people actually do care!’

Me: So, maybe you learned how to trust?

Freddie: Well, I didn’t learn it in that life, but it definitely sat really heavy with me to listen to people in the life that I came into. And I didn’t have any outlet, musically or otherwise. It was a very bland life. So, I thought the complete opposite would satisfy me. That’s when Freddie Mercury was created.

Me: Ah! And there was nothing bland about your life as Freddie!

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